Archive for July, 2010


Harry Potter's ButterbeerI snagged this recipe from Starline Hodge’s webcomic site, Candi – A College Story.

You should definitely check the strip out. It’s a lot of fun, has some great characters, and depicts parts of my university career with aching clarity, episodes that I think are universal to anyone who’s pursued higher learning at any institution.

Most of which I think a lot of us would would much rather forget.

*SHUDDER*

At any rate, thanks Starline!

BUTTERBEER

Ingredients:

1 cup (8 oz) club soda or cream soda

½ cup (4 oz) butterscotch syrup (ice cream topping)

½ tablespoon butter

Directions:

Step 1: Measure butterscotch and butter into a 2 cup (16 oz) glass. Microwave on high for 1 to 1½ minutes, or until syrup is bubbly and butter is completely incorporated.

Step 2: Stir and cool for 30 seconds, then slowly mix in club soda. Mixture will fizz quite a bit.

Step 3: Serve in two coffee mugs or small glasses; a perfectly warm Hogwarts treat for two!

Yummy! And to work up your appetite, here’s the latest trailer for Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows, Parts 1 & 2.

Advertisements

Episode One of the fourth season of The Guild is UP!


SQUEE

**/Spoilers/**

Since we left our intrepid heroes, Clara has decided to wear a squid on her head, Vork wants to build a guild hall, Zaboo is avoiding his Mom-Monster and Bladezz is flipping burgers at a fast food joint. Worst of all, poor Codex has the guilts over her night of hot monkey sex with Fox (aka Wil Wheaton), the leader of the Axis of Anarchy, the rival guild that nearly destroyed the Knights of Good last season.

To make matters worse, poor Codex’ desktop computer has gone down in a blaze of glory. Is it a sign to give up her budding relationship with Fox or a simple warning of worse to come?

We shall see…

As soon as some kind soul posts the epi to YouTube, I’ll get it up here for all to see.

It’s Just Some Random Guy never fails to entertain. See what happens when he turns his jaded eyes towards the Twilight and True Blood franchises.

Hope there’s a sequel! You can watch more Random Films on You Tube.

RIP Harvey Pekar - 1939-2010

RIP 1939-2010

“…In the long run, we’re all dead anyway.”

– Harvey Pekar, The Quitter, 2005

Harvey Pekar, the genius author behind American Splendor has died. He was 70 years old.

Pekar began his chronicle of everyday life in 1976 while he was working as a file clerk at Cleveland’s Veterans Hospital. American Splendor was an unflinching look at Pekar’s mundane and seemingly pointless interactions between himself and co-workers and hospital patients. As it evolved, American Splendor became an ongoing biography of Harvey’s life, his trials, foibles, worries and anxieties, eventually expanding to include his relationships with his wife Joyce Brabner and his adopted daughter Danielle. Harvey never pulled any punches, most notably when writing about his fight against lymphoma in ‘Our Cancer Year’, published in 1994. He would go on to write about jazz, the artists with whom he collaborated, the making of the movie American Splendor staring Paul Giamatti, and the wartime experiences of his friend and coworker Robert McNeill in Vietnam.

Pekar worked with some of the greatest comic artists of this century to produce American Splendor including: R. Crumb, Gary Dumm, Greg Budgett, Spain Rodriguez, Joe Zabel, Gerry Shamray, Frank Stack, Mark Zingarelli, and Joe Sacco. More recently Harvey teamed up with artists Dean Haspiel and Josh Neufeld and cartoonists Jim Woodring, Chester Brown, Alison Bechdel, Gilbert Hernandez, Eddie Campbell, David Collier, Drew Friedman, Ho Che Anderson, Rick Geary, Ed Piskor, Hunt Emerson, Bob Fingerman, Alex Wald and even legendary comics writer Alan Moore.

It was R. Crumb who first started working with Pekar on what would become American Splendor after they met in 1962. It was Harvey’s contention that comic books could be used to tell more than formulaic fantasy stories, that they could be something more:

When I was a little kid, and I was reading these comics in the ’40s, I kind of got sick of them because after a while, they were just formulaic. I figured there was some kind of a flaw that keeps them from getting better than they are, and then when I saw Robert Crumb’s work in the early ’60s, when he moved from Philadelphia to Cleveland, and he moved around the corner from me, I thought ‘Man, comics are where it’s at’.

Always irascible and opinionated, Pekar appeared multiple times as a guest on Late Night with David Letterman during the 1980’s until he was banned for wearing a t-shirt declaring himself to be “On Strike Against NBC”, railing against NBC’s parent company GE and accusing Letterman himself of being a corporate shill. According to Harvey:

[W]ith Letterman … you either lay down and let him insult you or you do something about it. Most people keep their mouth shut and let him dump on them. I don’t wanna do that.

Goodbye Harvey, you were authentic, original and thought provoking. We were all much better for having know you. You shall be missed.

Okay, just when you think you know where Universal Dead is heading, director Vernon Mortensen and writer Kelly Parks rip the steering wheel out of your (trembling) hands and makes a sharp left turn into the unknown, most likely a cornfield.

After this episode, I’m left wondering where the hell we’re going to end up? The only guarantee I have is that the ride to is going to be anything but predictable.

Did I see what I thought I saw at the end of episode?

The series just keeps on getting better and better. And for once, someone is addressing some of the burning questions that I’ve had since I saw Night of the Living Dead – does a zombie poop? (give me a break, I was twelve). But, from a biological perspective, if the circulatory system doesn’t work, why would the digestive system? How does a zombie derive nutrients from the flesh it consumes? Why does it have to be human flesh? Can a zombie become constipated?

These are subjects that I don’t think George Romero has ever dealt with.

To use thermodynamics and physics as a whole to answer these questions is bloody brilliant! My physicist husband was practically salivating. Not only did the writers use plausible science to drive the story, they actually got it *right*!  If it wasn’t for the cannibalism and the profanity, he could use this episode of Universal Dead to teach a senior Physics class.

The flatland theory described by Dr. Vataber (Doug Jones) has been around for at least 100 years – Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions was written in1884 by Edwin Abbott Abbott and was described by Isaac Asimov as being “The best introduction one can find into the manner of perceiving dimensions.” It’s been made into several short movies over the years, but it’s nice to see the theory taking front and center in a horror film.

This has me wondering what exactly is the training regimen for the U.S Navy?

Kudos go to Vernon, Kelly and the rest of the crew. The series keeps on getting better and better. Viewers are definitely kept on their toes. Special hat’s off also to Doug Jones for some great comedic timing and especially to Valerie Perez for eating that leg with such gusto. I’m not sure I want to know what it was made out of, but she seemed to enjoy mowing down on it a bit too much.

I can’t wait for the next chapter.